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December 12th 2017, Tuesday
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I want to find the weather for in .

Twenty Years of Great British Food

Posted by admin on 11th October 2017

With thanks to Sarah Lawless from The Big Partnership for the write up of our event below.

To mark the 20th year of Manchester’s Food and Drink Festival, Pro Manchester teamed up with Great British Chef’s, Ollie Lloyd, last week for an event that took attendees on a whistle-stop 20-year-tour of Britain’s love affair with food.

Hosted at Lunya, and sponsored by Big Partnership and Eversheds Sutherland, the sell-out event welcomed the best and brightest from Manchester’s food and drink scene.

From the initial retrospective on some superbly-seventies dishes, Ollie took the audience up to present day with in-depth insight into what it means to be a modern day foodie in Britain.

Following in-depth research conducted last year by Great British Chefs, Ollie was able to bust some common myths and share some suprising statistics on the state of our food-loving nation.

  • The food revolution does not have a gender; men and women are both as likely to describe themselves as Foodies
  • Foodies are more likely to try unusual ingredients, pay more for higher quality products and like discovering new brands
  • People who consider thenselves a foodie are more likely to shop at Aldi or Lidl, than those who don’t
  • The top three international cuisines cooked at home are, in order of popularity: Italian, Chinese and French
  • The most popular emerging international cuisine to cook from home is Cajun, with 47 per cent of Foodies giving it a try

The research also identified an increasing trend for authenticity and a movement away from big brands which has opened the door for many independent companies in recent years. Similarly, when it comes to food shopping, consumers are increasingly looking to small independents rather than large supermarket chains. Those that do use supermarket chains are now more likely to play to the strengths of the various retailers and  purchase different things from different locations.

To wrap up, Ollie left us with some strong predictions for the future of food – both for those who cook at home, and those that like to eat out.

There is a real shift towards more specialist diets in the younger generations. From vegetarians, to vegans and coeliacs to “flexi-tarians” (who knew that was a thing?) – younger people have increasginly strict dietary requirements and this is something that food and drink brands can look to capitalise on.

And for those of us dining out, Ollie noted a shift towards regional international cuisine. In a relatively saturated market, he said that restaurants will take on niche’s to offer something different. So whether it’s Keralan or Sri Lankan rather than a good old fashioned Indian, or Vietnamese and Cantonese over a traditional Chinese, expect more exciting recipes and more interesting flavours!

Thanks to all who attended the event and made it such a success! For more information on the research from Great British Chefs, please visit: www.greatbritishchefs.com/insight.

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